Showing posts with label madia matilda. Show all posts
Showing posts with label madia matilda. Show all posts

Sunday, 3 November 2019

Shop Unique - 10 Questions With Our New Brand - Hurd & Co





Shop Unique  - Spotlight on Hurd & Co





Madia & Matilda curated selection of brands, SHop UNique features our independent designers and brand who share our passion and ethos for ethical fashion, jewellery and products. We interviewed Dawn Hurd founder & designer of Hurd & Co 



1. Can you tell us a little more about the brand?  



Hurd & Co started by complete accident. I had made myself a chunkyscarf, a friend popped in for a cuppa, as a jewellery designer she had been commissioned to accessorise a fashion show. Upon seeing the scarf she asked me to make 15 which she intended to embellish with brooches… all 15 scarves sold out. 

From the beginning I knew I wanted to distinguish the difference between homemade and handmade, therefore branding was a huge element to me right from the start. I wanted to bridge the price gap between high end brands and quality products.  I had every faith in my ability to produce a garment which was of a high standard and to present it in beautiful packaging but it was important to me for this to be an affordable option for people.

This amazing journey has taken me from knitting at my kitchen table with acrylic, selling at local school events right through to changing my entire business model in accordance with the United Nations Global Goals and being featured on their 2019 installation at the Pure London Fashion Show at Olympia.
I have come to realise that running a business brings with it certain responsibilities.  I am now in a position to be able to give a little something back by donating 10% of all sales to the mental health charity MIND.  I am also currently exploring local Sit & Knit groups where I can invite elderly people living in rural communities who are at risk of isolation, depression and loneliness to gather together to Sit & Knit, drink tea, eat cake and to share laughter and worries whilst we listen to Vera Lynn.  Having a transparent production line and knowing the origin of my materials is hugely important to me, knowing that I am not making money at the cost of other people or the planet.



2.How do you make your Products? 





I make all of my products by hand following my own designs



3.What is the products made from? Components? 

I only use 100% wool either a British Blue Faced Leicester or a New Zealand merino. Where possible using natural dyes.
The branded tags which are attached to each garment are a natural cork leather which are laser printed to avoid the need for ink.





4.What inspires you? 

Problem solving has been a strong influence for me.  Having un-diagnosed Coeliac Disease for many years has caused me to suffer from elements of malnutrition as a result. I have always  struggled to find a high boot which didn’t leave a huge gap around my calf and so the boot topper was designed to hide the fact that my legs were so small. Likewise I was fed up of being so clumsy when wearing gloves trying to use my phone or pick things up so I designed the wrist warmers. They are longer than a standard glove to provide more warmth and also fingerless to free your hands.
I also have to mention that I cannot help but be inspired by the beautiful county where I live. Surrounded by the most breath taking ever changing woodlands is a constant inspiration for colour and textural elements of my designs.




5.Where do you make the product and what does sustainability or making a quality British product mean to you?

Everything is made from my home in Somerset. I have sole responsibility over quality control and strive for the highest of standards from each garment. The wool is sourced from a family run mill in Yorkshire, this is important to me as I know I am supporting British farming and the British Wool industry 






7.Favourite place to relax? 



A short walk from my home and I am surrounded by woodland, my favourite place to be. I like to see the changing seasons and collect reminders to display at home.





























I believe to encourage longevity from fashion we need to design garments based on timeless style rather than trend.  My products were born from a need for practicality and versatility ideal to wearworking outdoors or when out for a long country walk needing to feel both comfortable and warm. Alternatively I feel they are just as suitable in the city as more of a style element rather than for practical use.  I like to keep things simple therefore sewing the scarves in place requiring no styling just pop it on and off you go.  When people wear one of my garments I want them to be transported back to being a child feelings of being comforted and warm, reminded of wearing something their grandmother may have hand knitted for them, its all about hygge.


8. In the future what styles do you plan to make next?


I would love to expand my children’s range incorporating woollen tweeds.

9. What do you think about sustainability and how does it impact your business?

The business started as a hobby. In the early days my priority was to keep my over heads down I started off selling acrylic. The growth of the business was very quick and I became increasingly aware of my responsibility to not only understand the production chain but also the environmental effects of my purchasing decisions. Watching the Stacey Dooley documentary Fashions Dirty Secrets was a game changer for me. I’m not in business just to make money, this was an opportunity to encourage change. I researched the United Nations Global Goals to see how I could comply, I changed from acrylic to wool, from leather tags to cork, ensured all of my packaging was made from recycled material and was recyclable. Every effort is made to ensure ethical and sustainable production.

I feel I have the ability to influence consumers to use the power of their £ and become more conscience when spending.



10. What do you like about collaborating with Madia & Matilda? 

The main thing that attracted me was the tag line Sustainable British Fashion, a cohesive message which totally compliments my brand and what I am trying to achieve.


To shop now, you can find Hurd & Co on our Shop Unique selection or under accessories on madiamatilda.co.uk .


Sincerely Madia & Matilda




Sunday, 14 April 2019

Fashion Revolution Week






We at Madia & Matilda, are making change working towards
zero waste sustainable clothing cutting down our carbon impact and
working with Fashion Revolution, London Organic, Kindred and other designers to make 
a difference to the way we shop.












Fashion Revolution started, people from all over the world have
used their voice and their power that things must change. And we agree it time to change now, That’s why Madia & Matilda work from our own studio, where we work with awesome people from all over the world. Meet the people who make your clothes, 






The industry is starting to change and more brands are being open about where their clothes are made.We shall be discussing the people behind the clothes we wear.  






Crafty Ladies - Upcycling Workshop run by Madia & Matilda




With Madia & Matilda, you can be sure about the provenance of your garments – we know all our makers personally, in a good working environment, unlike other areas where workers are forced to work long hours in unsafe working conditions.




We campaign for a fashion industry that conserves and restores our environment and gives people, especially women, a voice. An industry where dignity in work is the standard and not an exception. On 24 April 2013, the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh collapsed. 1,138 people died and another 2,500 were injured, making it the fourth largest industrial disaster in history.
















Independent ethical brands from around the UK came together once again at London’s Kindred on Friday 26th April for London Organic's thought-provoking talks on what it means for you, or your business, to be ‘sustainable’ and ‘ethical’ while taking in short presentations from experts across the fashion sector.










In addition to talks and Q&A with a riveting mix of industry leaders and influences, Madia & Matilda showcased our collection in Catwalk show and there was also an opportunity to buy from those leading in the sustainable fashion and beauty fields!
















Here at Madia & Matilda, We consider each detail of the journey of our clothing, from the fabrics we use, to how we design, make and deliver our garments and its wash care process beyond in its life cycle. Our ongoing relationships with production partners and other hand crafters. All carefully considered, we find it important to ensure that the up-most kindness and respect is shown to the people and partners we work with. In fact, we’ve been working alongside the same few partners and makers for for around six years now, and since then we’ve grown our businesses and skills together.




As proud supporters of zero waste, slow fashion, our clothes are made to last, to be loved, and to be worn again and again. With this in mind we design for long term trends and instead, create timeless, contemporary pieces that our customers will love, with the greater aim of cutting down our environmental carbon impact. To find out more sign up to our newsletters



























Clothes worth wearing are worth repairing





When we wear our favourite items time and again, they are bound to show signs of wear and tear. But alteration to the zip or fixing a missing button, hem or torn sleeve can prolong the lifecycle of your garment and if it is a good outfit, why throw it away? It’s so easy to repair them with a patch, stitch or by darning. Be proud of the clothes you love! Check out our Alterations & price list and blog post on care for your clothing


























If you aren’t able to repair the clothing you no longer want, why not get creative? Try upcycling your old clothing to make it into something new. We've held workshops and upcycling classes over the years with a little elbow grease you create something new from your old garments.


Keep an eye out on our Facebook & Instagram Stories! @madiamatilda @madiamatilda_insider for further information on new classes


























Books to read on Sustainability and Upcycled fashion

- Make sure you pick up a copy of Fashion Revolution’s book, Loved Clothes Last.

- A copy our our piece published in Clothing Cultures Jounal by Intellect Ltd


- Also check out Fashion Revolution’s Loved Clothes Last film – a thought-provoking, three minute short film directed by Balthazar Klarwein.


- To Die For: Is Fashion Wearing Out the World? Book by Lucy Siegle

- Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion Book by Elizabeth L. Cline

- Sustainable Fashion and Textiles Book by Kate Fletcher

- The Sustainable Fashion Handbook Book by Sandy Black






Sincerely Madia & Matilda

Wednesday, 6 March 2019

International Women's Day 2019 - Women We Love


For International Women's Day, this year we have compiled a list of influential women that we love. 

Emma Watson 



British actor Emma Watson was appointed UN Women Goodwill Ambassador in July 2014. Watson dedicates her efforts towards the empowerment of young women and girls, and will serve as an advocate for the UN Women’s "HeForShe" campaign in promoting gender equality.



Stacey Dooley


Since 2009, Dooley has made social-issue-themed television documentaries for BBC Three concerning child labour and women in developing countries. Dooley has produce many documentaries and TV shows highlighting the impacts of ‘fast fashion’ and investigating the working conditions people endure in foreign countries to produce garments for companies such as H&M.


Clara Amfo


Clara is a regular presenter on the Radio 1 weekday schedule, she has interviewed the biggest names in the music industry, and presented from some of the most prestigious music festivals and awards ceremonies. Amfo aims to help women have the confidence to break through into the media industry as she was influenced by Lauryn Hill from a young age, a rare example at the time of a dark-skinned black woman whose talent was able to reach a large audience.

Lucy Siegle


Ethical living journalist, Lucy Siegle currently writes for the Guardian covering a range of topics from fashion and the environment to finance and food. Siegle has also recently published a book titled ‘Turning the tide on plastic’, that hopes to end the plastic pandemic and provide tips for long-lasting action.


Helen Clarkson


CEO of The Climate Group, Helen Clarkson, works internationally with leading businesses, states and regions to deliver a world of net zero greenhouse gas emissions. Experienced in the marketing and business industry, she ensures that sustainability is at the forefront of business strategies worldwide.


Kate Brandt


Kate Brandt is the current Google Sustainability Officer, leading Google’s worldwide operations, products and supply chain. Sustainability and cyclical economy are key to Brandt’s work, with her efforts being recognised by Obama in 2014 when he appointed her to serve as the Federal Environmental Executive. 


Susan McPherson


Founder and CEO of McPherson Strategies, Susan consults and invests in businesses and start-ups that have social good at their core. With 25+ years of experience in marketing, PR and sustainability communications industry, McPherson ensures that corporations and growing non-profits on how best to partner, build advocacy and drive visibility for their causes and initiatives.


Anita Roddick


Founding member of the Women’s Environmental Network and The Body Shop, Anita Roddick has been an environmental ambassador since the early 80’s. In total The Body Shop had over 700 branches, and Roddick was awarded the 1991 World Vision Award for Development Initiative. 


Dr Shakardokht Jafari


Originating from Afghanistan, Shakar is the Founder and CTO of Trueinvivo Limited, which with support from Innovate UK has developed a radiation detection system for cancer care that aims to save lives, money and offer a better quality of life to patients. In January 2018 Shakar received a prestigious Women’s award from the Afghanistan government and a recent meeting with a director could lead to a film biopic.













Sincerely Madia & Matilda

Sunday, 17 February 2019

Random Acts of Kindness Day 2019



The impacts of fast fashion and how we can change to be kinder to the environment.

We've got 9 simple tips to help you be kinder to the environment.


1. Quality over quantity 

Cheap prices equal cheap materials. Save the environment and yourself some money by buying better quality garments. We’ve all experienced the disappointment of an item falling in holes a couple months after we’ve bought it. Fast fashion is one of the main culprits of environmental damage in the 21st century. The less we invest into fast fashion the quicker brands will improve their garment quality. 


2. Think before you throw
Whether it no longer fits, is stained or has a hole in it, think before you throw. Throwing away your unwanted clothes may not be as environmentally friendly as you first thought. Over £12 million worth of clothes are put in landfill each year in the UK alone. Before you throw, think ‘could this be fixed?’ ‘Could I sell it?’ ‘Can I donate it to a local charity?’ There are many ways clothes can be recycled before they reach the end of the line.

3. Care for your clothes 

Washing our clothes has a significant impact on the environment. 75% to 80% of the damage caused to our clothing comes from the effects of washing and drying. Washing your clothes according to the label can add to your clothes lifespan and save you money in the long run. When you wash your clothing make sure you consider what products you’re using – there are now many eco-friendly washing liquids to help you cut down on your impact on the world. 



4. Buy from sustainable brands 

Many small start-up brands are turning towards sustainability to break into the fashion industry. Admittedly, the offering form sustainable brands is still limited but the more we demand eco-fashion the more will be available. If you’re looking to shop with a sustainable eco-friendly brand, why not check out our website. All of our garments are made from end of line fabrics and upcycled items, and we also alter clothing. 



5. Bring your own bag

To reduce your plastic waste, ensure you bring your own shopping bag wherever you go. Although it may seem quick and easy to grab a plastic bag while you’re shopping, but research suggests that plastic bags release three times the greenhouse gas of reusable bags. If you want to be super eco-friendly why not buy recycled tote bags. Madia & Matilda stocks some amazing printed tote bags from British brand Graphyx which is a sustainable brand using vegetable oil based ink. 


6. Reduce your plastic use

Reducing the amount of plastic you use can have a massive, positive effect on the environment. Start today, by making easy substitutes like plastic bottles to reusable water bottles, plastic straws to paper or metal straws and reusable bags. Keep your take away tubs and Nutella jars, wash them out and use them to store bulk foods or leftovers. These simple swaps are easy to make and could help save the planet. 



7. Don’t be afraid to buy second hand or swap items

Second hand garments are not always worn out or dirty as the media would often have you believe. Second hand items can come from charity shops, websites like eBay and Facebook, or apps such as Depop or Shpock. More often than not, these clothes are hardly worn and are in very good condition. Alternatively, you could do a clothes swap organised through a local event or social media. By participating in a clothes swap you are able to get a feel of what the fabrics and styles are like before you buy. 



8. Buy British

Buying British is key to creating a sustainable shopping industry in the UK (obviously this can apply to any country you live in). Supporting local and British businesses is a great way to be kind to the world too. By buying British you are able to identify exactly where the product is produced and its components are sourced, which often leads to higher quality garments being produced. 



9. Alter and mend to get the most out of your wardrobe

A fallen hem or missing button shouldn’t mean your clothes need to be thrown away. Either learn some basic sewing skills to repair your own clothes or take them to a local tailor for a small fee. Mending or altering garments can increase their lifespan and save you money. If you buy from a clothes swap or second hand shop you can easily tailor them items to fit you and your style for little money.

















Sincerely Madia & Matilda